As early voting gets underway in Montgomery County, the candidates in the Clarksville municipal election answered key questions about themselves, their wards they hope to serve and plans they are making if elected to the council.

There are 22 candidates listed in seven wards on the Nov. 3 ballot. Nineteen of the candidates answered five questions posed to them by Main Street Clarksville. The answers are printed just as the candidates submitted them.

Early voting began Oct. 14 and will continue through Oct. 29. Early voting takes place at the Montgomery County Election Commission office at Veterans Plaza at 350 Pageant Lane in Clarksville.

What is your current employment, or retirement? Please list all military history, including branch and years served.

Ward 3

DaJuan Little – No response

Ward 4

Tim Chandler - Retired from the Clarksville Police Department with 34 years in law enforcement. Last duty assignment was Homeland Security Coordinator for the Police Department with Tennessee Homeland Security District 7.

Wallace Redd - Currently along with my wife of 40 years Helga Redd, we own and manage our residential rental business, Redd Properties. I am also the current Preacher at Sugar Creek Baptist Church in Woodlawn. We are the past owners of Helga’s Daycare that operated in Ward 4 for 20 Years. Starting in 1978, I served our country for seven years in the U.S. Army, including two tours in Europe with the 2/11 Armor Calvary Regiment. I also served at Ft. Campbell in the 101st Airborne Division.

Margaret Thompson - I am currently employed as a special education teacher for the Clarksville-Montgomery County School System, 2013-present; TSBA Mid-Cumberland Volunteer Recognition Award Recipient; Teacher Leaders Academy 2018-2019; CMCEA Building Representative; Partner in Education Representative; Education Foundation Representative; Veterans Day Committee; Medical Emergency Response Team; After school tutoring; and, other duties as assigned.

Ward 5

Joey Dasinger - I currently work at Hankook as an inspection operator.

Melissa Eldridge - Currently a small business owner 1-On-1 Care Matters, LLC; Retired licensed physical therapist assistant; USAF Veteran 4 years of service.

Jason Knight - I am in the Army Reserves currently up for promotion to Major. I have served 15 years total service in the military with 9 years’ service at Ft Campbell KY, and 3 combat deployments, twice to Iraq and once to Afghanistan, I am also a Montgomery County Commissioner, District 18.

Ward 8

Wanda A. Allen - I am currently working as a Survivor Outreach Support Coordinator with the Army Community Service (ACS) Survivor Outreach Program. I just started this position in August. Prior to this position, I worked at the Family Advocacy Program and the Exceptional Family Member Program at ACS. I have been at ACS since 2010. I am a Licensed Social Worker. I am also an adjunct instructor at Austin Peay State University. I served honorably in the U.S. Army for 9 years.  

Faye Rennell Hobson - I am a retired 25-year Teacher. Prior to becoming a teacher, I served as a Child Youth Service Director for MWR and held various state positions in the field of criminal justice. I have never served as an active duty serves member, but both my father and husband served. However, I worked for the Department of Defense Education Activity from August 2002 through October 14, 2016. 

Ward 9

Scott Comperry - No response

Christopher Lanier - Lanier Lawn & Landscaping, LLC., Landscape Contractor for 21 years. Have a bachelors in Agriculture and minor in Business from APSU. 

Brad Morrow - I retired from the US Army in November 2017. Although retired, I continued my education, earning a B.S. (Magna cum Laude) in Public Management from APSU, and I am currently in the Masters Teaching Program at APSU to become a high school chemistry teacher. I started a small business in 2018, Bespoke Business Innovations, and I specialize in business development, systems integration, and in helping other young business-people and entrepreneurs achieve their dreams.

Karen Reynolds  - I currently work at Bleachfield Army Community Hospital as a Business Process Improvement Analyst. I am a retired Army Master sergeant. I served honorably for 21 years.

Ward 11

Jimmy Brown - I am currently employed with the Montgomery County Sheriff's Office. I am the Sergeant of our Technology and Logistics Division. I've been with the Sheriff's Office since 2000.

Ashlee Evans - As long as I have been old enough to work, I have worked in the service industry. I love serving folks. Currently, I am unemployed. I am a stay at home mother, as well as a full-time student. COVID has presented its challenges to my family but the great thing about being human is being adaptable and pushing through our challenges. 

Gary W. Norris - I retired in 2015 after a career of 30 years as a small family business owner manufacturing concrete products and supplies. During my career I was also involved in housing construction as a contractor and later as a construction consultant at Ft. Campbell. My last job before retirement was with a local engineering firm where I worked as director for business development.

Ward 12

Trisha Butler - I am currently an Editor with Scoop Media Group and am pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in History at Austin Peay. I did not retire from the Army but got out in 2014. My military record is as follows: US Army - May 2004 - December 2013 minus an 18-month break in service. I was a 92Y Supply Sergeant and Battalion level logistician. Left service honorably both times the second time as an E5 Sergeant. I was stationed at Fort Campbell October 2004 - June 2006 then Fort Riley June 2006 - November 2011 (this is where I did my break in service as well) then back to Fort Campbell November 2011 until I left the service. I served three combat tours, first with 2-101 Attack Helicopter Battalion (FTCKY) in 2005 (at the time they called it OIF III) to Quayyarah West, Iraq (with some time in Mosul and Balad), second tour to Iraq with 2-1 General Support Aviation Battalion, Charlie Company Boomer Dustoff (FTRKS), in 2010 first in Taji, then to Mosul for half of the deployment finishing up the second half in Speicher. That tour was during both Operation Iraqi Freedom and into Operation New Dawn. My last combat tour was to Afghanistan in 2012 (Operation Enduring Freedom) with 5-101 GSAB (FTCKY). I spent most of the deployment at Bagram but the end three months at Shank.    

Jon Lockwood - I am employed by Technica LLC. I am a contractor on Ft Campbell. I am a retired Army veteran with 20 years of service.

Joe Shakeenab - I am a 28-year U.S. Army Veteran. I served 20 years with the 5th Special Forces Group at Ft Campbell and retired in 2010 as a Chief Warrant Officer Four (CW4). I served in a variety of liaison, leadership, and management positions, especially as a Special Forces Warrant Officer. I come with a vast amount of knowledge and measurable experience in planning, directing, and advising in support of military and civilian organizations, at the international, national, and community levels.

Guy Stanford Jr. - I am self-employed. I own Fat Shack Clarksville and I provide a variety of consulting services. 

Adam Walker - No response

David Webb - Disabled Air Force Combat Veteran with 4 ½ years of service. Air Education Training and Command - Airman of the Year.

What city boards, councils, commissions have you served and the dates served? Please list any civic or club history of which you have been involved.

Ward 3

DaJuan Little - No response

Ward 4

Tim Chandler - Clarksville City Council Ward 4, 2017 to present. Chairman Streets and Garage Committee and Chairman Designation Committee. Serves now on Gas & Water Committee and the Finance Committee. Have served on Transportation Committee and the Community and Economic Development Committee. Past President Clarksville Jaycees and President for two years of the Northwest High School Baseball Booster Club. I have received the Sierra Club's endorsement in this election.

Wallace Redd - I served as a Ward 4 City Councilmember from 1997-2000, then from 2005 – 2016. I also served as District 16 Montgomery County Commissioner from 2015 -2018. In addition to being a longtime sponsor of The Christian HOPE Foundation in Haiti, I am life member of the Disabled American Veterans, member of the Tennessee Farm Bureau, Sugar Creek Baptist Church, The Black Horse Association, The International Brotherhood of Magicians and a sponsor of the Mt. Olive Cemetery Historical Preservation Society. I am a graduate of the Clarksville Citizens Police Academy.

Margaret Thompson - Jr. Civitan Advisor (Chartering Advisor); First Honor Club of Distinction in Valley District 2018, 2019; International Club of the Year 2018; International Jr. Civitan of the Year 2017; International Community Service Project of the Year 2017, 2018; International Social Service Project of the Year 2018; Campus Project of the Year 2018; Multiple International 2nd and 3rd place projects; Multiple district level awards; Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Incorporated; Social Action Chair 2019-2020; Epistoleus Committee; Scholarship Committee; Membership Committee; Finance Committee; Community Service Committee; NPHC secretary 2018-2020; Scholarship Chair; Relay for Life Committee.

Ward 5

Joey Dasinger - I have been part of the Libertarian Party of Montgomery County, on which I currently serve as treasurer, and have previously served as chair and vice chair. I have also participated off and on as a member of the Toastmasters Club here in Clarksville.

Melissa Eldridge - Clarksville Advisory Board of Directors for Tn Dept of Human Services Division of Rehabilitation; Personal Support Service Agency for TN Association of Home Care; Leadership Clarksville - Class of 2003; Steward pro tem at St. Paul AME Church in Oakwood, Tennessee.

Jason Knight - I serve on the County Jail & Juvenile committee, the Investment Committee and the Library Board. I am Chairman of the Animal Care and Control Committee and I serve on the Tennessee

County Service Administration Education Committee. I am a member of the Kiwanis Club and the Veterans of Foreign Wars (VFW) Post 4895. 

Ward 8

Wanda A. Allen - I am a member of Mount Olive Missionary Baptist Church under the Pastorate of my husband, Dr. David D. Allen, where I serve as the president of the Divine Sisterhood Womens' Ministry and a member of the Mother's Board. I have been a proud member of Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, INC since 2004, where I have served as the parliamentarian in both of my undergraduate (Nu Zeta) and alumni (Iota Pi Sigma) chapters and Vice-President in my undergraduate chapter. I am a graduate of Leadership Fort Campbell (2020) and a graduate of Leadership Clarksville (2016). I am a former member of the Clarksville Rotary Club (Noon) and a member of the Clarksville Area Chamber of Commerce.    

Faye Rennell Hobson - I have not served as a local board member or commission. However, I have served in various capacities as a member of KAPPA DELTA PI International Honor Society in Education (Lifetime Member), DELTA SIGMA THETA Sorority, Inc., Ladies Auxiliary 9191 (Lifetime), NAACP (Lifetime), Order of the Golden Circle 306, Order of the Eastern Star, Heroines Templers Crusade 39, and American Legion Auxiliary 223. Within these organizations, I have served in various positions such as treasure, secretary, fund raising coordinator, NAACP Scholarship Chair, Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. Scholarship and Social Action Committee, etc. 

Ward 9

Scott Comperry - No response

Christopher Lanier - Chamber of Commerce Business Development Committee 2017-current; Kiwanis Club of Clarksville 2004-current (Past President & current Board Member); Night Stalker Association 2017-current (Help raise money thru Memorial Paver Project and NSA Bass Tournament as Tournament Director); Montgomery County Bass Club 2014-current (President); Montgomery County Antique Tractor and Engine Club 2017-current (Vice President); Austin Peay Bass Team 2015-current (Advisor and APSU Bass Tournament - Tournament Director); Clarksville Camp Rainbow 2016-current (supporter of Radiothon and Children’s Bass Tournament); Turkeys for Troops 2018-current (Help organize, sponsor and logistics coordinator).

Brad Morrow - I have not served on any city boards or commissions. I am on the board of the Academy for Academic Excellence (AAE), a local school that concentrates on provided exceptional education to children with special learning needs. I have also been the elected treasurer of the Montgomery County Republican Party for the past two years. I am an Eagle Scout, a Kentucky Colonel and a member of Alpha Tau Omega. I am conversationally proficient in German and Spanish, and am currently learning Russian and Turkish. Effective communication is my passion, and so I strive to meet people in their own comfort zone. Oftentimes this means learning how to communicate with someone in a completely new language (for me), and I relish the challenges and opportunities that come as a result.

Karen Reynolds  - I am a member of the Women Veteran’s of America Chapter 47, the Hilldale Kiwanis Club of Clarksville and the Sierra Club Clarksville-Montgomery County

Ward 11

Jimmy Brown - I am a graduate of Leadership Clarksville Class of 2011. Since then I've been very active in the organization either chairing or co-chairing the adult and youth Law, Crime, and Justice Day. I've been a member of the Traffic Safety Task Force since 2004-current. I'm been a Deacon at my church since about 2014.

Ashlee Evans - I am not involved in any clubs. I am an ally/activist with BLM, and I try to volunteer and help the community in any way I am able. 

Gary W. Norris – June 2019 to present-Clarksville City Council Ward 11; January 2020 to present-Human Relations Commission; 2011 to 2012 and 2016 to 2018-City of Clarksville Board of Zoning Appeals; 2016 to present-Chair of Clarksville-Montgomery County Historic Zoning Commission and Common Design Review Board; 2015 to 2020-Economic and Community Development Board; 2002 to 2006 and 2011 to 2016-Clarksville-Montgomery County Historic Zoning Commission; 1999 to 2010--Chairman (Eight years) Clarksville-Montgomery County Regional Planning Commission; 2004 to 2011-Montgomery County Board of Zoning Appeals; 2001 to 2005-Chairman Clarksville Chamber of Commerce Government Affairs Committee; 2007 to 2008-Chairman Clarksville Chamber of Commerce; 2007 to 2008-Chairman Economic Development Council; 1985 to 2015- Director Clarksville Montgomery County Home Builders Association; 1985 to 1998-Co-Chairman Clarksville Montgomery County Housing Task Force; 2004 to 2015-Board of Directors for Montgomery County Habitat for Humanity; 2013 to 2015-Chairman of Board of Directors Montgomery County Habitat for Humanity; 2007- Leadership Clarksville; 2009-Clarksville Citizen of the Year Award; 2019-Volunteer Tennessee Governor’s Volunteer Star Award; 2013-Clarksville-Montgomery County Homebuilder Association Jackie W. Goad Hall of Fame Award.

Ward 12 

Trisha Butler - I have not served on any city boards, councils, or commissions. I have attended or volunteered with Awaken Church, Montgomery County Historical Society, Riverfest, tnAcheives Mentor, and various veteran organizations to name a few. 

Jon Lockwood - I have not served on any boards or commissions in Clarksville. I have served as Senior Pastor of The Family Worship Center for 20 years and as an associate Pastor for six years prior.

Joe Shakeenab - I have not served on any city boards, councils, or commissions. However, from 2014 to present, I have served as the vice president of the Montgomery County Board of Directors. Furthermore, I serve as the president of APSU National Alumni Association and the president of the APSU Military Alumni Chapter. In both capacities, I strive to build scholarship endowments and increase a greater range of alumni engagement at APSU. As part of the APSU National Alumni Association Executive Board, I serve on the following three committees: Board Management, Mentoring, and Career Services. In addition to the stated, I’m currently serving on the Presidential Search Committee and the Capital Campaign Committee at APSU.

Guy Stanford Jr. - I am not on in city boards at the moment, but I plan to try to join the Community & Economic Development Committee, as well as the Public Safety Committee. I am a member of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc., and Alpha Kappa Psi Business Fraternity, Inc. 

Adam Walker - No response

David Webb - Board member of Veterans for Tennessee (past).

How long have you lived in your ward? Please tell us something unique about your ward.

Ward 3

DaJuan Little  - No response

Ward 4

Tim Chandler - I have lived in ward 4 for a total of over 50 years and 33 plus years at my current residence. Ward 4 is a very unique area of Clarksville, we set right on the edge of the Woodlawn Agriculture area. We have a large military population and then we have the old school area of New Providence. We have been able to meld all of the different lifestyles into one large area that comes together.

Wallace Redd - I have lived in Ward 4 for the last 35 years. Ward 4 has the beautiful Greenway with two access points of Pollard Road and Mary’s Oak Drive. The Greenway is 9-miles of walking and biking trail that is situated along the banks of the Red River and West Fork Creek. Much of the cost of this trail was from grants and donations.

Margaret Thompson - I have resided in Ward 4 for about eight years. There are so many wonderful things about Ward 4 that it is hard to pick just one. I enjoy Ward 4 for its diversity. In some of the established areas, you can find homes built in the 1920s next to homes built in 2020. The people are just as different as they are the same. You can meet people on the greenway, right here in Ward 4, from all over the city. You even have a little industry with the quarry and barges. Ward 4 is unique just because it is Ward 4.

Ward 5

Joey Dasinger - I have been in Ward 5 for a total of four and a half years, with the remainder of my time in Clarksville being just outside of the ward. What I find unique about Ward 5 is its proximity to main roads on four sides to easily get to and from this area of town, where ever people need to travel. 

Melissa Eldridge - 18 years. Ward 5 is the fastest growing ward with an increase of over 2,000 new registered voters, since the August primary election.

Jason Knight - I moved to Clarksville in 2004 when I joined the army and was assigned to FT Campbell. My ward has a large population of military, and veterans, and being a member of the military myself, I can relate to the unique needs of our military and veteran families. 

Ward 8

Wanda A. Allen - I have lived in Ward 8 for 3 years. However, I have lived in Clarksville for 18 years. Our ward is unique because we have a diverse population to include Clarksville natives, active duty military, retirees, civil servants, and veterans.

Faye Rennell Hobson - My husband and I first arrived in the Clarksville/Fort Campbell is in April 2001. We lived in base housing on Fort Campbell until July 2005. We purchased a home in Bluegrass Downs July 2005. Even though we both deployed in and out of Clarksville, we maintained our home and residency. We have called Clarksville home for 19 years. We are one of few original home owners in Bluegrass Downs. Bluegrass Downs Subdivision is located in Ward 8, which is the ward in which I am seeking office. There are many unique things about Ward 8, but Bluegrass Downs tells a story. The first 4 streets leading into the subdivision are named after 4 famous race horses. You enter the subdivision by way of Man O War, immediately to the left is Secretariat followed by Whirlaway which is the first right turn and directly in front of our home is Alysheba. Man O War and Secretariat are known as two of the fastest race horses in racehorse history. Long before Tennessee became famous for the Tennessee walking horse in the mid 1900's, the state was known throughout the country as the center for thoroughbred horses. For most of the nineteenth century, Tennessee, not Kentucky, was acknowledged as the center of horse breeding and horse racing in the United States. 

Ward 9

Scott Comperry - No response

Christopher Lanier - Have lived in Ward 9 for 15 years. The uniqueness of Ward 9 is how far it goes and the demographic captured is very broad. Ward 9 stretches from the north of Glen Ellen/Sugartree Area all the way to Madison Street and can’t be reached without traveling thru other wards. We have new and old infrastructure due to diverse areas. 

Brad Morrow - I have lived in Ward 9 since 2015, when I moved into town from Woodlawn. Since that time, I have gotten to know my neighbors and now count them among my very best friends. My neighborhood, and most of Ward 9, is a very diverse and vibrant slice of Clarksville. My neighbors are Black, White, Asian, Latin, Italian, and Haitian. We are police, home inspectors, active duty military, retired, teachers, media personalities, truckers, cooks, and small business owners. Ward 9 represents all of Clarksville in a way that I don’t think the other wards can claim to, and it will be an honor to represent all of the people of Ward 9 with transparency, inclusivity, competence, and virtue.

Karen Reynolds  - I have lived in Ward 9 for 19 years. Ward 9 has a lot of new homes but also included the historical district of Porters Bluff and the Glenwood Historic District

Ward 11

Jimmy Brown - I've lived in my home since 1999. I think a unique thing about Ward 11 is it's mix of residential and retail space. With parts of Wilma Rudolph Blvd, Warfield, 101st, and Memorial Drive in Ward 11, we face challenges with traffic and growth firsthand. Solutions to those challenges are something I will work with constituents to solve. 

Ashlee Evans - I have lived in ward 11 for almost 8 months. Ward 11 in unique because we have the honor to host Dunbar Cave and Swan lake. Two wonderful green spaces and parks that provide and escape from our day to day. We also cover a pretty large area meaning we have a lot of diversity in this ward.  

Gary W. Norris – I am a lifelong resident of Clarksville and have lived in Ward 11 for 34 years. Ward 11 is a long narrow Ward boarded on the south by Memorial Drive, on the east by Warfield Boulevard and Wilma Rudolph Boulevard, on the North by McGee Court and Spring Creek and on the west by Whitfield Road, East Old Trenton Rd, Old Russellville Pike, Dunbar Cave Road, Red River and Ussery Road. It is comprised of single-family residents, apartment buildings, mixed use, industrial and commercial businesses. It has three golf courses, Dunbar Cave State Park, and Swan Lake Park and Sports Complex. It has traffic issues like most of Clarksville, but it is unique in that it has not had a lot of new development during the past year. A significant portion of the residential homes are in established neighborhoods. There is still some vacant land in the ward and more development could come at any time.

Ward 12 

Trisha Butler - We sold our first house near Kenwood schools and bought our home in Meadows of Hearthstone in October 2018, so we just passed our 2-year anniversary in Ward 12. I think the most unique thing about the ward is how diverse the community is. We have APSU students, long-time residents, and also many veterans who are either still serving or, like my husband and I, left the service and put down roots here. We are also unique in how new growth is affecting our area, ward 12 has caught much of the population from expansion. 

Jon Lockwood - I have lived in ward 12 for 25 years. Ward 12 has a large majority of the retail in the city to include Governors Square Mall, and all the hotel/motel business, and multiple restaurants along Wilma Rudolph Blvd.

Joe Shakeenab - I have resided in Ward 12 for the past 20 years. My ward stretched eight miles (from Exit 1 to Exit 8), covers a large amount of our city’s business district on Wilma Rudolph Blvd, and could use designated walking trails in the Tylertown and St. B. areas. Our baseball complex in the St. B. area is widely but a more foot traffic capabilities in and around the complex is desirable for many residents. 

Guy Stanford Jr. - I have grown up in this Ward for about 24 years with our family home being my grandparent’s home for over 30 years. Ward 12 is a beautiful family-oriented community. The Tylertown/Oakland area especially; mostly everyone knows everyone and most of the residents have been living there for a very long time. It’s also very cool that Ward 12 covers Northeast and Rossview; which are very great schools academically and athletically. 

Adam Walker - No response

David Webb - My wife, Rosha, and I have lived in ward 12 since 2015. I’ve met with many of our friends

from Ward 12 and am impressed by how diverse and down to earth everyone is. We all have the common interest of our community and Clarksville as a whole foremost in our hearts.

If elected, what main issue would be a priority that you would try to address within your first six months of council meetings with regards to your ward in particular?

Ward 3

DaJuan Little  - No response

Ward 4

Tim Chandler - We have got to get a handle on over and unchecked growth. This I believe is creating the traffic and school over population problems. A good example is the over growth in the area of Tylertown Road. Gas & Water is having to pay over $500,000 to move their service lines so the road can be improved to handle the traffic. This area was labeled as unchecked and over developed 12 or more years ago. I will continue to vote for smart growth.

Wallace Redd - I will work on addressing the traffic going up Boot Hill in New Providence. At certain times of the day the traffic is really bad. I will also start looking at speeding in our neighborhoods. I will work for cleaner and safer neighborhoods with better roads, sidewalks and parks. In short, my main priority will be to put our neighborhoods first.

Margaret Thompson - I think residential speeding is an issue in every neighborhood I have walked through. It is not just a Ward 4 issue. I would love to put together a joint effort to “Slow Your Roll” or “Chill at the Wheel” awareness or public service campaign jointly with the county commission. There are too many parent and grandparents sitting in those seats for there not to be something done. There are enough voices that we will be heard. I would like to see Ward 4 expand in the types of commerce it attracts. There seems to be a pawnshop or Payday Advance every block from Peachers Mill to 101st. (Ward 4 stops at Lafayette) It would be nice if the residents of the area did not have to travel 30 minutes and wade through traffic to shop and have a sit-down dinner.

Ward 5

Joey Dasinger - I plan to address the city ordinances in Clarksville which I believe use government over reach to infringe on citizens' rights. I hope to present some of these to be removed. I would also hope to sponsor or co-sponsor a resolution to decriminalize cannabis in the city. 

Melissa Eldridge - Seeking federal grants to improve infrastructure for sidewalks to increase safety in our community.

Jason Knight - I am the only candidate actively working with the street department to help stop speeding within our residential communities to protect our children’s and families and I seek to continue that effort. I have been able to get speed counters placed in several locations in the ward to include N. Henderson Way, Plantation Estates and Broadripple Drive. I would like to also get a speed study done in the McClardy and Ringgold areas as well. This will help with the process of implementing speed reduction measures to alleviate speeding in our residential areas. 

Ward 8

Wanda A. Allen - My priorities would be our traffic, community centers and activities for all of our youths and adults with special needs and safety in our ward. 

Faye Rennell Hobson - If elected as Ward 8 City Councilwoman, one of my first priorities for Ward 8 is to address the traffic concerns about speeding, the need for various signs throughout the Ward and placing traffic lights in well needed places throughout the Ward. Such will include more police presence on Trenton Road and Tiny Town for safety reasons. This is a concern of all Ward 8 constituents. 

Ward 9

Scott Comperry - No response

Christopher Lanier - Traffic issues within Ward 9 need addressed and some of that has to do with the old and new infrastructure. How people access their homes and travel thru the city contributes to many factors in their daily lives. Many new neighborhood entrances have to add left hand turning lanes (some miss right hand turn lanes) and timing of lights to alleviate wait times are just a few issues that need addressed. 

Brad Morrow - I am not the kind of person who looks at individual issues in a vacuum. Most aspects of city government are interrelated and I would approach them as such. The priorities of a government are evident by where they allocate their money. My first priority would be to perform a deep dive into the finance and budget process to identify where our priorities can be better served by a reallocation of existing funds. I would like to address the expected future projections of our Police, Fire, and EMS services, as well as the critical needs of our Housing Authority and Street Department through a reevaluation and, if necessary, reallocation, of available revenue.

Karen Reynolds  - I will work with our first responders to document the number of calls that involve residents requiring mental health or other community services. I would like to partner with our public defenders to add a social worker or psychologist as support to their team. Studies indicate this will result in fewer interactions that end in an apprehension by a officer without a warrant. This occurs when an individual is taken into police custody because they are an imminent danger to themselves or others. This process can save money for the community by decreasing ambulance trips, emergency room visits, and public safety costs.

Ward 11

Jimmy Brown - Great question. It's hard to plan for the future without looking at current issues. Long-term of course I'll focus on roads, jobs, and housing. Some more immediate concerns include managing the increase in traffic and growth the MPEC will bring to downtown Clarksville. One example I can think of is electric scooter companies who establish businesses around event centers and downtown areas. We saw the problems Nashville was having with the scooters, I would like to see some ordinances put in place next year before we have the same issues as other cities. 

Ashlee Evans - A big priority in the first six months on council would be to see where we are in regard to infrastructure. We need to be making our city road expansions a priority before we pile houses onto the roadways that are already struggling. Next, I would be advocating for a less burdensome justice system via decriminalization of minor possession of marijuana. Victimless crimes are not crimes and should not be prosecuted as such. 

Gary W. Norris - Growth and traffic concerns appear to be paramount in the minds of many residents. The decisions the city council makes are based on the professional advice from the planning commission, department heads, school system leadership, police leadership, fire protection leaders, the city council members, and our mayor. I would encourage our citizens to become involved and participate by providing the council with their thoughts and recommendations. We are all wanting the best for Clarksville. I am reachable by phone and email as provided on the City of Clarksville’s webpage. The input from our residents allows me to visit the neighborhood and add their prospective to my decision. The input received in the past has been both positive and negative, but it has allowed me to respond with what I feel is the best response for ward 11 as well as the City of Clarksville. My priority is to invite, communicate and encourage more input from the residents of Ward 11.

Ward 12

Trisha Butler - There are a few things I would focus on. My biggest priority would be to make myself available and respond to things residents are asking right away, I've been advised in the community that is something they have had a problem with in the past. I have promised to try to remove the recent amendment to the code where attorney fees for ethics complaints are able to be reimbursed, I would follow through with that. Mainly I would sit down and really scour the code to see what we can get rid of (such as the ordinance against spitting from 1968). I have to bring it back full circle to prioritize setting up a way to hear from the constituents in regard to their feelings on upcoming votes and listening to what they would like me to put forward legislation wise. 

Jon Lockwood - When elected my main objective is to connect with the other council members, both new and old to establish a working relationship that looks to the interest of Clarksville as well as ward 12.

Joe Shakeenab - In addition to understanding my specific and implied duties associated with being a council member and my assigned committees, I will initiate talks to address threats to vehicle traffic on Rossview Road where more shoulder should be added, and I will work to prioritize foot traffic of students in the vicinity of Oakland Elementary and Rossview schools.  

Guy Stanford Jr. - My MAIN priority would be building a relationship with the community on a professional level. I will hold quarterly meetings, sometimes monthly meetings to always stay updated on issues and concerns directly. This gives me the opportunity to get ideas from the community and work together. 

Adam Walker - No response

David Webb - Our infrastructure is outdated. In Ward 12 we continue to allow developers to build houses and apartments without considering the consequences on how it affects our traffic, watershed/flooding and our citizens. Clarksville as a whole should be promoting Smart Growth and we are substantially behind. We need to hold our developers accountable with an Ordinance that 10% of developments’ initial sales/ property values be earmarked in a special fund for updating and maintaining proper roads, sidewalks and green spaces.

Growth is a large part of the issues addressed during Clarksville City Council meetings. How should council members, and how would you, address the development of subdivisions based on what infrastructure is already in place or is being planned (or not planned) for the area of the proposed development?

Ward 3

DaJuan Little  - No response

Ward 4

Tim Chandler - Basically I would continue to make sure that the roads schools and infrastructure can handle the development before voting yes.

Wallace Redd - Growth is both good and bad. It’s good that we live in a city that is attractive and people want to move here. In some ways it’s bad because it puts a strain on our infrastructure. As a Councilmember looking at the development of a subdivision, we are advised from the Regional Planning Commission, both the staff and the board. Each city department makes an analysis and reports it to the council before a vote of approval or disapproval. Nearby residents give their input to the council. The property owner gives his input to the council along with the plans for the property. In the end a councilmember has to weigh property rights with the cost of infrastructure on the city and the concerns of the nearby residents. No two cases are the same.

Margaret Thompson - The crazy amount of growth they are putting in the Trenton/Needmore area without the roads and schools to support it is unfair to the people who live there and to those who will unknowingly purchase in an environment that is not prepared for their presence. I believe infill is appropriate and mixed-use housing is needed, but it must be planned and prepared for. The city must now go back and find ways to relieve traffic on already crowded roadways to make room for more vehicles for homes they have given the green light to build causing a greater traffic jam with the construction. I’m not anti-growth. It’s going to happen. It is great for the economy. But we need to be better stewards of the taxpayer’s dollar, my dollars, my neighbors’ dollars by planning the growth and being strategic about it.

Ward 5

Joey Dasinger - I believe in a largely hands-off approach to government in terms of what the private sector does, but we should encourage developers to take responsibility where they build so that those who buy property from them will have the best quality of life, especially in terms of infrastructure and traffic related issues.

Melissa Eldridge - Streets/street lights should be studied prior to the development to improve current traffic woes and ensure better flow of traffic in the area. We have to ensure developers are placing postal receptacles as directed by recent mandates. Sewer and water accesses should be smartly placed as to not create relocation issues in the future.

Jason Knight - Our Population is 205, 960 people with a median age about 29-35. We have grown to about 11,000 people within the past few years. We need places for individuals who are coming to our city to live. we just have to ensure as local officials we are addressing the infrastructure needs. We need to ensure roads are widened, sidewalks are placed in residential areas for safety and to curb speeding in residential neighborhoods.

Ward 8

Wanda A. Allen - So, I need to be clear, I am not against growth in Clarksville. I love this city and I want others to have the positive experiences that I have had in this city. As for our infrastructure and community planning, we must do more. As a city we should be thinking ahead 20 years about what needs to happen to accommodate the growth. I do not believe that we should stop the growth, I believe that we need to be more proactive in our city planning when it comes to infrastructure. We cannot be voted the one of the best places to live in America without a plan to maintain what we have, a plan to encourage our growth and a plan that projects future growth without missing opportunities in real time. 

Faye Rennell Hobson - Growth in Clarksville Montgomery County is a concern for most, but it is not a complaint. We welcome the growth. I believe all members of City Council should want the best for their Ward and all Wards are a part of our growing city. If each member of City Council takes care of their ward and address the issues of concern. It will be a win win for the City of Clarksville. We should all be concerned about the infrastructure of our roads and schools. I believe Builders should welcome and allow input from home owners in neighborhoods prior to building, etc. Building inspectors need to take a look at the whole picture vs only the view point of the developers. Yes, COVID-19 took place, but beginning a road project right before the start of school on a street as busy as Trenton road, was in my opinion not a good move. Students had been out of school for approx. 5.5 months. This is only one example of many. When building we must think about the families, which include the children. Take into consideration adding parks, playgrounds, youth/family centers. 

Ward 9

Scott Comperry - No response

Christopher Lanier - Growth is going to be an issue in a town such as Clarksville. Clarksville is a great place to live and raise a family. We have to be diligent in our infrastructure planning but just as much effort needs to be applied to our aging infrastructure (Utilities, Street Department, Roads, etc.). Access to and from developments (residential and commercial) should be planned/maintained or reassessed for current and future needs. We are blessed with growth and need to be able to plan for the future to continue to have access to an area without adding to the congestion. Left-and right-hand turning lanes need to be added to developments to not slow the other traffic down. We must look at Clarksville as a whole and address all areas of safe travel across the city also. I cover most of the city almost daily within work and see many areas of current improvement added and areas of needed improvement. 

Brad Morrow - When I talk to my friends and neighbors they often ask, “Can’t the city council just talk to these developers and get them to agree to widening a road or doing something to help with traffic when they want their zone change to put in an apartment complex?” The question makes sense, right? I mean, if the city government has to approve the zone change in order for the development to occur, then can’t the same government get the developer to agree to a few conditions first? That practice actually has a specific name in the legal dictionary, “Contract Zoning,” and under current Tennessee law it is illegal. If a city government works with an individual property owner on a specific contract for a single development, the opportunities for a corrupt quid-pro-quo are nearly limitless. Our courts saw the trouble with this sort of activity and, so far, have not been inclined to allow it. The short answer, therefore, is that as a city councilman I will NOT promise things that I can’t deliver, like getting the developers to do things in exchange for their permits and zone changes. Anyone who tells you they can do that is lying to you. What I will say is that I will listen to the voices of the people of Ward 9 and in the case of any development that has a substantially negative impact on the quality of life for the people of our Ward, I will vote against it. I will not, however, vote against a development just because it may increase traffic. We need developers to continue building homes in order to keep prices affordable and the city in a growth pattern. The traffic issues (and other infrastructure issues) must be addressed through better long-term planning with state and local authorities (County Highway Department, TDOT, etc.). As I said in my answer to an earlier question, none of these issues exist in a vacuum. They are all interrelated and must be addressed in a comprehensive way. I feel like my unique combination of leadership experience, personal values, and direct knowledge makes me the best candidate for the job. Thank you!

Karen Reynolds  - Growth in Clarksville is a fact of life and we need to have a growth plan that coordinates all levels - city, county, state and federal government.  We can not pave our way out of our traffic issues.  As a City Council Woman I would ensure that we plan for the additional traffic and growth, ensuring we are reserving space to expand the roads, upgrade sewers, utilities while reserving green spaces in our neighborhoods.

Ward 11

Jimmy Brown - We have to strategically plan for growth. By strategically planning I mean looking at existing and future plans for road expansion and construction by the city, county, and state. Have that road construction mirror housing and subdivision development. For example, if both are on a 3-5 year timeline for development than the area can support the growth, but if the completion date for the subdivision is before the infrastructure, then we need to reevaluate. Also, in the strategic planning process we have to look at schools, utilities, parks, jobs, etc. Growth is not a bad thing when done correctly. 

Ashlee Evans - It is no question that we are growing. Keeping up with housing inventory keeps the prices of our homes down, in turn keeping them affordable. We need to be making good use of our land. We need to be making sure the roads were building on are sustainable and sound before we decide. We are seeing urban sprawl and are in desperate need to see responsibility in our development.  I would also love to see more mixed-use development happening to combat this as well.

Gary W. Norris – The positive results brought to us with growth are applauded by all. But with positive results, we can also anticipate negative issues to be addressed. Smart growth is a term used meaning making better use of our land. Our planning commission has given us new zoning classifications and modified others to help us use our land in a more productive way. For example, R6 residential zoning will allow more units per lot which is a great classification for infill development and existing small lots. There are several examples of this in the downtown area. C2 commercial zoning will allow residential units within a commercial district, example exit 11. All residents have the opportunity and are invited to attend a planning commission meeting and a City Council meeting to learn about how all the information is gathered and reviewed when considering a case to approve or disapprove a zoning request. Existing infrastructure and planned infrastructure is discussed. Stub streets in subdivisions have become a problem as we are now seeing vacant land around existing subdivisions being developed. The Mayor announced at our last meeting that the Street Department is going to be installing signs at the end of these stub streets stating that there could be future development connected to these streets. I would continue to review all input and information provided and offered and make the best decision for Ward 11 as well as the City of Clarksville while continuing to address any negative results.

Ward 12 

Trisha Butler - As a person who puts great emphasis on personal rights, which apply to property rights, it is likely that I would vote favorably for re-zoning. I do want to start holding builders responsible for the pressure they are putting on infrastructure. If your undertaking is going to add traffic etc. then you need to also be a part of the solution to those issues as well. I'm not against capitalism but there is an inherent responsibility to ensure that the problems created by fruitful enterprise aren't being shoved off onto the taxpayer. I also always encourage back/infill over urban sprawl.

Jon Lockwood - I have said all along we have to be proactive in development to ensure infrastructure is in place. Items such as sidewalks, street lights, fire/EMS access. We need to be safety minded about our citizens. 

Joe Shakeenab - Infrastructure to support growth is an important issue and such conversations must continually be assessed. There must be a priority to fix accommodations to existing areas. Open discussion should be held, especially in terms of cost, and all stakeholders should have representation. I would volunteer to be on any committee associated with planned development because it is a disservice to our residents to build communities and then have to reach back to address infrastructure requirements, prioritization, and funding. I believe we can do much better in this and many other critical areas. I bring a variety of staff development skills to the council and this is why I am running for city council.

Guy Stanford Jr. - Myself and other the other city council members should treat every project and initiative like a business. We need to collect every piece of data to ensure we are doing everything right, building the right team, and keeping a transparent line of communication with the community. Most people do not know what’s going on and we have to change that. A business approach to every project will create more confidence in the city knowing that these projects are done with care; from spending the money the most efficient way possible, being completed in a timely manner by putting pressure on the developers, and things being done right the first time. 

Adam Walker - No response

David Webb - Growth is inevitable, but desirable in the proper locales that span Clarksville. Smart Growth is “key” in order to mitigate urban sprawl within the many populated locations of Clarksville. Planning is essential and should be adamantly fostered. Roadways, sidewalks and other vital services must be maintained and updated for our citizens. Sidewalks must also be available readily available for our pedestrians, including areas that were previously grandfathered in from installation, as this is essential to keeping our children and community safe.

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